THE ENTREPRENEUR IN ME

     

      I was born with an entrepreneurial spirit (this is what my friends and family told me). I started my first real "pay check paying” job when I was 13, scooping beans into bags at a coffee shop, (I was too young to actually touch the machines.) As you can imagine, the thrill of scooping beans wore off quickly so I asked to be moved into the company's custom basket shop where I was given the creative freedom to put together custom baskets. I loved the creative aspect of the job, but even more than that I loved to watch the customers come and sift through the pre-made baskets and select their favorite one. It was thrilling to watch customers pick out something I had made and I got a rush out of putting together the next great basket that would sell hot off the shelves (that didn’t always happen).

      I It would be a very long story if I recounted every job that I held between the age of 13 and 22, because I changed jobs frequently often holding 2 or more jobs at once. I liked variety as I bored easily so I gravitated towards jobs that gave me freedom to do things my own way and that also allowed me to make money based off my own performance (jobs where I could earn tips or commissions.)  I loved the challenge that came with these types of jobs and to be honest, I liked the control that I had in making my own success. I quickly learned in these types of jobs what my strengths were and adapted and developed new skills to perform better. I was always my toughest critic and so under my own supervision was where I thrived. 

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     This summarizes the story of my beginnings in the workforce, but the art of business started at a much younger age for me. Growing up, my brother and sister and I began the business of "room sales". These were much like garage sales, except they weren't open to the public and I only had two people to sell to: my siblings. However, you can't always be picky in business, so regularly on Saturday mornings I would holler to Marley and Brett to tell them my room sale was set up. I raided my drawers and closet for useless gadgets that I no longer had any interest in and then began the practice of selling to them. (Selling to them means that I made up a lot of nonsense of why the half burned candle was a collector’s item and worth every cent that I was asking.)

     

     This was great for a while; mostly it gave me a few bucks to head down to the corner candy store and stock up on loot. But, after a while it was much harder to make sales to my siblings. This led way into a new business, "the lemonade stand." Us 3 siblings formed a partnership and during the summer months we set up our stand at the end of the block to sell a whopping 3 cups of lemonade (if we were lucky). You can imagine the profits in this were quite small split among 3 people. Luckily, my siblings didn't have the same interest in this endeavor as I did, so we split ways and I took on a new business partner, a neighbor girl who lived across the street. We teamed up and collaborated ideas, our brightest of which was to start moving our lemonade stand around the block to gain new customers. Things were looking up, until we had a business dispute and I had to fire her. From there I took the business solo, and I knew if I wanted to take it big I needed to change my way of thinking. So with the help of my Mom and Dad, I entered a young entrepreneurs contest at the local Rotary Club and I WON!

     

I won a crisp 100$ bill and with that I opened my first business bank account.  Do you have any idea how much lemonade you can buy with $100?? I expanded my business. With the money I made I invested in some new equipment.  My Uncle built me a lemonade stand trailer, which attached to the back of my bike. A large sign stood tall from the stand so I could proudly announce my arrival wherever I chose to set up shop. There was also enough space on the trailer to store a large ice cooler. Not only was I able to sell lemonade but I now had room to store ice cream treats too! Now I could travel from neighborhoods to neighborhood and look for the best spots to set up my business. I often targeted neighborhoods under construction, because those construction workers were so thirsty working in the summer sun, I could raise my prices and usually sell out in half a days work. 

     I dabbled in other self started side jobs over the years, a gardening business, a mobile hair salon, I even pitched a pond mobile hot dog stand to my Grandpa when my grandparents moved into a new condo backing onto a pond. I always loved the thrill of dreaming up ideas and figuring out a way to make it work. (more often that not, my ideas didn’t work.)

     I've also worked for really great companies and have learned a lot about business, personal development and have been mentored by incredibly smart businessmen and women, many of whom ran their own businesses.  I've always felt the pull to do something on my own, to take my ideas, my skills and mostly my desire and create something that is mine. The idea of Wrinkle & Crease came to me during the time I was at home on maternity leave with my daughter Avalyn. I realized it was the perfect time to start something, because I still wanted to be at home with her and I realized as I was dreaming dreams for her and her life, that I still had some unfulfilled dreams of my own.

     

     I have always loved paper. A chronic list maker and greeting card lover, I have always been able to make better sense of my thoughts, my ideas and the words in my head when they are written on paper. I wanted a business that was both creative and inspiring, a way to encourage other women around me to dream big dreams, do big things and I wanted to offer a line of products that could assist in the planning and dreaming of these things. I wanted people like me who are planners, and dreamers and writers of things to have beautiful products to write on, to keep and to share with others.  

 

     

     Wrinkle & Crease is a brand new venture for me. It's busy, it's less than perfect and I'm figuring out the juggle of a home-based business with the biggest business of all, raising my daughter. I'm excited to share with you this dream and also to share with you here some of the things that have brought me to where I am, what inspires me and some of the struggles along the way. Thanks for all of your support thus far and allowing me to make this possible.

Xo,

Kayley

 

 

 

Posted on March 12, 2015 and filed under About.